Posted by: Shagg | December 10, 2010

Touhouregon Trail (Because why not)

The party consisted of: Reisen, Patchouli, Chen, Cirno, Aya and Suwako.

February 29, 1852
Here begins the journal of Reisen, formerly a doctor. Tomorrow we leave Independence behind to begin our journey west to Oregon City. We must still purchase the supplies that our large farmwagon will hold to sustain us during our long trek.
I hope that the following skills will prove of some use along the trail: medical, riverwork, botany, commerce/trade, cooking, sewing.

March 1, 1852
Took advantage of the package deal offered to me. What a relief not to have to shop for all that individually!
Purchased 12 oxen.
Purchased 3 8-oz. bottles of alum, 3 16-oz. bottles of ammonia, 2 axes, 50 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 3 16-oz. boxes of borax, 3 16-oz. bottles of brandy, 3 pounds of butter, 3 8-oz. bottles of camomile, 3 4-oz. bottles of camphor, 9 canteens, 3 16-oz. bottles of castor oil, 30 pounds of celery, 3 8-oz. jars of dandelion, 3 8-oz. boxes of Dover’s Powder, 40 5-lb. sacks of dried fruit, 50 5-lb. sacks of dried vegetables, 3 8-oz. bottles of Duffy’s Elixir, 3 12-oz. bottles of epsom salts, 2 fiddles, 1 fishing net, 2 fishing poles, 1 fishing spear, 1 frying pan, 1 grandfather clock, 1 hammer, 3 hatchets, 3 4-oz. bottles of iodine, 3 16-oz. bottles of isopropyl alcohol, 3 4-oz. boxes of James Fever Powder, 3 8-oz. bottles of linseed oil, 3 16-oz. bottles of olive oil, 3 4-oz. bottles of peppermint, 1 pocket watch, 5 20-lb. sacks of potatoes, 30 30-foot lengths of rope, 100 pounds of salt pork, 3 4-oz. bottles of sarsaparilla, 3 6-oz. bottles of sassafras, 1 saw, 3 4-oz. bottles of spearmint, 3 16-oz. bottles of turpentine, 7 water kegs, 3 gallon jugs of whiskey, 3 8-oz. bottles of witch hazel.
Purchased 10 pairs of boots, 10 hats, 10 sets of clothing, 6 winter coats, 6 winter scarves.
Purchased 1 large farmwagon, 1 spare wagon axle, 1 spare wagon tongue, 1 spare wagon wheel.
Saw Blue River, sight is most reassuring.
The ice looks like it will hold the wagon… So across we go.
Approached Westport today. Some people in our wagon train are very tired of the journey.

March 2, 1852
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
Saw a mountain lion not far from New Santa Fe.

March 3, 1852
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.
Today we saw Lone Elm. What a sight!

March 4, 1852
After some concern that we were lost, we saw Blue Mound in the distance.

March 7, 1852
Today our labors were rewarded with the sight of Kansas River.
The ice looks like it will hold the wagon… So across we go.

March 8, 1852
Today we have traveled 100 miles.
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

March 9, 1852
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.
Arrived at Saint Mary’s Mission.
Purchased 2 boxes of 20 bullets, 2 25-lb. kegs of gunpowder, 1 rifle.

March 10, 1852
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
Saw Red Vermillion River, sight is most reassuring.
Reached Scott Spring. Strangely beautiful country.
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

March 11, 1852
Patchouli has been suffering from frostbite. We hope to gradually warm affected area.

March 13, 1852
Rested for a time near Alcove Spring.

March 14, 1852
Got as far as Big Blue River today.
Not much else to do, but cross our fingers, and hope the ice holds.

March 15, 1852
With such cold weather, [name] [have/has] frostbite. At this time, I will gradually warm affected area.
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

March 16, 1852
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to wait for conditions to improve.

March 18, 1852
Stopped near St. Joseph Road Junction for a while.

March 23, 1852
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.
Rested the animals near The Narrows.

March 24, 1852
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

March 25, 1852
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

March 26, 1852
With such bitter cold weather, Suwako is freezing. We’re hoping to stop and build a fire.
Passed “The Coast of Nebraska” today.

March 27, 1852
Made it to Fort Kearny.
Purchased 2 boxes of matches, 45 pounds of salt pork.

April 4, 1852
Commenced early today; saw Plum Creek.

April 5, 1852
Suwako came down with a bad cold, and I decided to increase fluid intake.

April 7, 1852
The fog is as thick as pea soup. I reckon we’ll wait for conditions to improve.

April 11, 1852
Spotted a group of strangers. We decided to wait to see what they do.
They moved on.

April 12, 1852
The fog was awful this morning. We decided to slow down.

April 13, 1852
Came to O’Fallon’s Bluffs. Had a talk with some of the other folks in the wagon train.

April 16, 1852
Chen has cholera. I decided to administer peppermint.

April 18, 1852
Terrible fog during the early part of the day. We chose to wait for conditions to improve.

April 19, 1852
Saw South Platte River, sight is most reassuring.

April 22, 1852
Fording the river looks to be our best option.

April 23, 1852
Passed the five hundred mile mark today.

April 24, 1852
Found ourselves at Ash Hollow this day. Got a nasty splinter in my thumb, but extracted it without too much difficulty.

April 29, 1852
Patchouli has a concussion. We’re going to administer laudanum.
Enjoyed some good fiddle music today during our nooning near Courthouse and Jail Rocks.

May 3, 1852
From our guidebook, estimated we would reach Chimney Rock today, and sure enough, there it was!

May 7, 1852
We saw a small party of coyotes today, just a mile or so west of Scotts Bluff.

May 8, 1852
After much travail, we came to Robidoux Pass Trading Post.
Purchased 65 pounds of salt pork, 12 pounds of tea.

May 12, 1852
Heard some gunfire in the distance near Laramie River. Much concern all around.
Reached Fort Laramie.
Purchased 6 30-foot lengths of chain.
Purchased 2 lanterns.

May 13, 1852
Our expectations of reaching Register Cliff were fulfilled this day.

May 18, 1852
We came upon a portion of the trail that was flooded, and had to try to ford through the water.

May 19, 1852
Suwako came down with a bad cold, and I decided to increase fluid intake.

May 20, 1852
Had a bit of a run-in with another wagon party today near Ayers Natural Bridge, but we patched up our differences before nightfall.

May 28, 1852
After some concern that we were lost, we saw North Platte River in the distance.

May 29, 1852
Enjoyed a cup of coffee with Mr. Lumare today at noon near Mormon Ferry Trading Post.
Purchased 2 hats, 3 water kegs.
Passed Emigrant Gap.

May 31, 1852
Today came to Willow Springs.

June 2, 1852
Today we reached Independence Rock.
We saw a small party of coyotes today, just a mile or so west of Devil’s Gate.

June 3, 1852
We found some wild fruit and decided to stop and gather fruit.
We gathered 28 pounds.
We’ll continue, despite the eternal mosquitoes.

June 4, 1852
Heard some gunfire in the distance near Split Rock. Much concern all around.

June 5, 1852
Cirno has a concussion. We’re going to administer laudanum.
Saw a small, foul-looking pool of water near Three Crossings. Could be poison; I prevented our animals from drinking it.

June 9, 1852
Today we have traveled for 100 days.
The trail brought us to Sweetwater River today.
Decided to ford the river.

June 10, 1852
Nooned at Ice Spring Slough.

June 15, 1852
For a time today we feared we were lost. We were much relieved to find ourselves at an identifiable location, Final Sweetwater River Crossing.
Decided to ford the river.

June 16, 1852
Learned today that Patchouli has alkali sickness. We plan to administer flour and water.
We’ll continue, despite the eternal mosquitoes.
Sore feet today, but I’ll manage. Saw South Pass.
Our expectations of reaching Pacific Springs were fulfilled this day.

June 17, 1852
Broke a wagon axle today. We will have to try to repair it.
We were unable to make the repair.
We were able to replace it from supplies.

June 18, 1852
Encamped a while near Dry Sandy.
Saw “Parting of the Ways”, sight is most reassuring.

June 19, 1852
Sore feet today, but I’ll manage. Saw Haystack Butte.

June 22, 1852
In good spirits today; got as far as Green River.

June 24, 1852
Given the price, we will take the ferry.

June 26, 1852
Today we have traveled 1,000 miles!

June 27, 1852
Today we reached Branley Pass.

June 28, 1852
This morning it was very foggy. We decided to slow down.
Today we reached Emigrant Spring.

June 30, 1852
Today we passed West End of the Sublette Cutoff.

July 1, 1852
After some concern that we were lost, we saw Thomas Fork in the distance.

July 5, 1852
Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

July 6, 1852
Passed Smith’s Trading Post Site today.

July 8, 1852
Today came to Soda Springs.

July 9, 1852
Camped today near Hudspeth Cutoff at Sheep Rock.

July 15, 1852
The mosquitoes have become quite troublesome. We hope to continue.

July 16, 1852
Saw a grave dug up by wolves near Fort Hall–bones scattered about. A most distressing sight!
Purchased 23 hats.

July 17, 1852
We found an abandoned wagon. We decided to search it for something useful.
We found: 2 pairs of mittens; 4 spare wagon wheels.

July 18, 1852
A thick fog rolled in today. Looks like we’ll continue as usual.
Sore feet today, but I’ll manage. Saw American Falls.

July 20, 1852
Found ourselves at Raft River this day. Got a nasty splinter in my thumb, but extracted it without too much difficulty.
Fording the river looks to be our best option.
The trail continues to provide wonders and surprises! Today we made it to California Trail Junction.

July 21, 1852
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

July 22, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

July 23, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

July 24, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

July 25, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

July 26, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
The wagon tongue broke. We will try to repair it.
We were unable to make the repair.
We were able to replace it from supplies.

July 27, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

July 28, 1852
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

July 29, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.
Today came to Caldron Linn.

July 30, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

July 31, 1852
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

August 1, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

August 2, 1852
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.
There was a wedding in camp today not far from Rock Creek. A joyous occasion in the wilderness!
Decided to ford the river.

August 3, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

August 5, 1852
We came upon some fallen rocks on the trail and decided to wait for conditions to improve.

August 6, 1852
We came upon some fallen rocks on the trail and decided to wait for conditions to improve.

August 7, 1852
We came upon some fallen rocks on the trail and decided to wait for conditions to improve.

August 8, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

August 9, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
Reached Kanaka Rapids.

August 10, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
Came to Thousand Springs. Had a talk with some of the other folks in the wagon train.
Happened upon a fresh grave near Upper Salmon Falls. A reminder of the hazards we all face on the this journey.

August 11, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

August 12, 1852
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.
We were fortunate to happen upon some wild fruit. We will stop and gather fruit.
We gathered 23 pounds.

August 13, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

August 14, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
Arrived at Three Islands today.

August 15, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
The weather turned mighty hot, so we’re planning to continue as usual.

August 16, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
The weather turned mighty hot, so we’re planning to continue as usual.

August 17, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.
The weather turned mighty hot, so we’re planning to continue as usual.

August 18, 1852
The weather turned mighty hot, so we’re planning to continue as usual.
Rested the animals near Bruneau Sand Dunes.

August 19, 1852
We endured a most unpleasant sandstorm today. We decided to continue as usual.

August 20, 1852
A sudden duststorm came up today. It seemed best to continue as usual.

August 21, 1852
Arrived at Bruneau River, despite some “help” from Nicholas J. Tillman.
Decided to ford the river.

August 23, 1852
Saw Castle Butte today.

August 26, 1852
Reached Givens Hot Springs. Strangely beautiful country.

August 27, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

August 28, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

August 29, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

August 30, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
We found some wild vegetables and decided to stop and gather vegetables.
We gathered 8 pounds.

August 31, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

September 1, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
We found some wild vegetables and decided to stop and gather vegetables.
We gathered 20 pounds.
Made an early start this morning; passed East Cow Hollow.

September 2, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
Heard some gunfire in the distance near Lytle Pass. Much concern all around.
Passed Malheur River about noon.
Fording the river looks to be our best option.

September 3, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

September 4, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
The fog is as thick as pea soup. I reckon we’ll continue as usual.

September 5, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
Saw eagles today near Farewell Bend. What majestic creatures!
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 196 pounds of meat.

September 7, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
A thick fog rolled in today. Looks like we’ll continue as usual.

September 8, 1852
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.
After some concern that we were lost, we saw Burnt River Canyon in the distance.

September 9, 1852
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

September 10, 1852
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

September 11, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

September 12, 1852
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.
Got as far as Flagstaff Hill today.
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 166 pounds of meat.

September 14, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

September 15, 1852
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

September 16, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

September 17, 1852
Will this journey never end! Today we have traveled for 200 days.
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
We found some wild fruit and decided to gather while continuing.
We gathered 6 pounds.
Reached Grande Ronde River.
Fording the river looks to be our best option.

September 18, 1852
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

September 19, 1852
Our wagon tipped over. We lost 1 8-oz. bottle of alum; 1 10-lb. sack of dried beans; 1 5-lb. sack of dried fruit; 1 5-lb. sack of dried vegetables; and various other items.

September 20, 1852
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

September 21, 1852
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

September 22, 1852
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to wait for conditions to improve.

September 23, 1852
It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to wait for conditions to improve.

September 24, 1852
The trail continues to provide wonders and surprises! Today we made it to Emigrant Springs.

September 25, 1852
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.
Nooned late today not far from Deadman Pass.

September 26, 1852
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.
Saw Doe Canyon today.
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 236 pounds of meat.

September 28, 1852
Today came to Umatilla Valley.

September 29, 1852
Happened upon a fresh grave near Umatilla River. A reminder of the hazards we all face on the this journey.
Fording the river looks to be our best option.

September 30, 1852
We had to double-team the animals to try to get our wagon out of the mud.

October 1, 1852
Passed Trail Junction at the Umatilla River today.

October 2, 1852
Got as far as Echo Meadows today.

October 5, 1852
Sore feet today, but I’ll manage. Saw Four Mile Canyon.

October 7, 1852
There was a wedding in camp today not far from McDonald Ford of the John Day River. A joyous occasion in the wilderness!
Decided to ford the river.

October 9, 1852
Today we saw Biggs Junction. How sublime it appears by moonlight.
Today I saw Deschutes River.
Fording the river looks to be our best option.

October 11, 1852
We laid by today near Camp Drum at The Dalles.
Made it to McCord Creek.

October 12, 1852
Arrived today at Oregon City!! At last we have reached our destination! Truly this is the land of opportunity!

January 7, 1853
Obtained a land deed today from the county for 366 acres. Now I can begin to build my new life!
Final Score: 5525

January 8, 1853
In 1852, Reisen settled on 366 acres of land in an area that would later become part of the city of Portland, Oregon.
The fortitude and determination that had served Reisen so well on the Oregon Trail proved equally valuable in the new land, contributing to tremendous social and economic success.
Regrettably, several of Reisen’s descendants—including a major figure in an early twentieth-century government and business scandal—have managed to tarnish the family’s good name.

Advertisements

Responses

  1. ….wow, you did it without a single death. VICTORY!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: